The Best Violin Rosin Reviews for 2020

Rosin for violins: for many beginners, rosin is not something that is given much thought until the bow is in desperate need of it, or if the rosin has broken and has shattered into a thousand pieces on the floor. For advanced and professional violinists, rosin is a very important consideration for the quality of sound as well as the time of year. In this guide, we will discuss the Top 10 Best Violin Rosins across all budgets and playing styles, as well as a few details to know when shopping for rosin for violin.

The Original Bernardel Rosin

Original Bernardel Rosin 1

The Gustave Bernardel rosin is an excellent choice for violin, viola, and cello. For generations, the Original Bernardel rosin for violin has remained a reliable and favored choice for students and professionals alike. It is a light rosin with medium stickiness, allowing for smooth playing and a clean, bright tone. It is made for violin, viola and cello. Comes in a handy pouch and made in France.

PROS

  • Affordable
  • Decent quality for all styles of violin playing

CONS

  • Soft packaging means it could break easily when dropped
  • Difficult to hold for young beginners

Sound Harbor 2 Pack Rosin

Sound harbor 2 Pack Rosin

The Sound Harbor Rosin for violin, viola, and cello is perfect for beginners with its easy-to-hold design and protective case to prevent breakage. This handmade light rosin is of decent quality, making it a good choice for beginner and advancing students. It has great grip and allows for a clear sound. Because the rosin is sold in a pack of two, it is also a good bargain choice for parents and teachers. It is also recommended by a lot of musicians

PROS

  • Affordable
  • Hard protective case
  • 2-pack – great for siblings, inevitable breakage, or for forgetful musicians

CONS

  • Decent quality but maybe lacking for advanced players
  • Some customers found the rosin to be fragile when shipped

D’Addario Kaplan Premium Light/Dark Rosin with Case

DAddario Kaplan Premium Rosin

The D’Addario Kaplan Premium Rosin is high quality, USA-made rosin specifically at a facilities in New York. It is available in light and dark varieties, offering versatile options to players of all climates and preferences. It is conveniently designed for one-handed use in an attractive, protective case. This is a fine choice for advancing and professional players. It can also be rotated for an even wear over time. The D’Addario Kaplan Premium Rosin is available for violin, viola, and cello.

PROS

  • Its protective case is aesthetically pleasing and prevents damage
  • The dark variety is said to have low-dust

CONS

  • Some customers have found the rosin to have unreliable consistency
  • More expensive

The Original Hill Rosin – Light & Dark

The Original Hill Light Rosin

Hill Rosin is another tried and true rosin that has stood the test of many generations of string players – both student and professional alike. It has a simple design, wrapped in a padded, velveteen shell that offers some protection from minor wear and tear. The Hill Dark Rosin offers slightly more grip than the Hill Light Rosin, but both are excellent choices. Used by professionals worldwide. Hill Rosin is available for violin, viola, and cello.

PROS

  • Good quality

CONS

  • High risk of breakage with a soft shell
  • More expensive

Super Sensitive Rosin – Light & Dark 

Super Sensitive Light Violin Rosin

Super Sensitive Rosin is another standby, reliable choice made by many educators looking for suitable rosin for beginning students. It comes at a good price and offers decent quality and consistency. Super Sensitive Rosin is available for violin, viola, and cello.

PROS

  • Wooden rectangle casing is easy for beginners to hold and offers some breakage protection
  • Affordable

CONS

  • Less nuanced tonal impact

Jade L’Opera Rosin

Jade LOpera JADE Rosin

The Jade L’Opera is a popular favorite among professional violinists and is also enjoyed by violists and cellists. It is celebrated for being a low-dust option while also having a clear sound with good grip. The Jade L’Opera Rosin is available for violin, viola, and cello.

PROS

  • Sizeable rosin cake can last a long time
  • Protective carrying case
  • Low dust
  • Won’t scratch fine varnishes

CONS

  • High risk of breakage with a soft shell when out of the case
  • More expensive

Melos Light/Dark Rosin

Melos Dark Violin Rosin

Melos Rosin is a fine rosin sourced from pine trees in Greece and is a favorite for many professional violinists. In fact, it’s one of the few rosins that are tapped from actual living trees. Melos Rosin is available in both light and dark varieties. This rosin is most suitable for violin, but it can also be used for viola.

PROS

  • Quality craftsmanship
  • Excellent grip

CONS

  • High risk of breakage with a soft shell
  • More expensive

Pirastro Olive/Evah Rosin

Pirastro Oliv Evah Rosin

The Pirastro Olive/Evah Rosin is specifically formulated to compliment Pirastro’s Oliv and Evah Pirazzi strings. This rosin provides a good grip and an excellent, warm tone while also having minimal dust. The Pirastro Olive/Evah Rosin is available for violin, viola, and cello.

PROS

  • Minimal dust

CONS

  • High risk of breakage with a soft shell
  • More expensive

Pirastro Goldflex Rosin

Pirastro Goldflex Rosin

Pirastro Goldflex Rosin is a luxury rosin used by professionals that features tiny flecks of gold inside the rosin. The purpose of the gold is to allow for an extra smooth grip and a warm and bright tone and is available for violin, viola, and cello.

PROS

  • Top-quality, nuanced rosin

CONS

  • High risk of breakage with a soft shell
  • More expensive

Super-Sensitive Clarity Hypoallergenic Rosin

Super Sensitive 9250 Clarity Hypallergenic Rosin

It is worth noting the Super-Sensitive Clarity Hypoallergenic Rosin since it is well suited for those with sensitive allergies. Because rosin dust is often made with pine sap, the rosin dust can aggravate allergies for some people. The Super-Sensitive Clarity Hypoallergenic Rosin is instead made with a synthetic hydrocarbon resin, leaving it unaffected by humidity changes throughout the different seasons.

PROS

  • Hypo-allergenic
  • Unaffected by humidity

CONS

  • Some customers have found that this rosin does not have enough grip

Why do violinists use rosin?

Rosin is a hardened block of sap or resin sourced from a tree that violinists (and all string players for that matter) use on the bow to help the bow catch the strings. Violin rosin is important because it helps the violin bow interact with the violin and contributes to the quality of sound. The type of rosin that sounds great with one violin and bow may not sound as good with another violin and bow – violin rosin can have a very unique relationship to the strings, bow, and violin itself.

What is the best kind of violin rosin?

There are a variety of different kinds of violin rosin and there is no real way to determine what is “best” for one violin or bow. However, one significant difference to consider is light rosin versus dark rosin.

Light Rosin vs Dark Rosin

When shopping for violin rosin, you may notice that there is a clear distinction made between “light” and “dark” rosin. There are a few considerations to make with choosing a type of rosin, including the type of instrument you play, as well as the kind of climate you live in.

Light Rosin

Light rosin is harder and less sticky than dark rosin and is best suited for smaller instruments such as violin and viola. It is an excellent choice for those living in hot and humid climates because it produces less sticky powder that could hinder the sound and damage the strings and varnish if it builds up too much.

Dark Rosin

Dark rosin tends to be softer and stickier, lending itself well to bigger instruments such as cello and bass. It is also well suited for cool, dry climates. It can become too sticky for hot and humid climates. For this reason, many players actually rotate rosins with the seasons – choosing a dark rosin for colder months, and a light rosin for the warmer months.

What kind of rosin do professionals use?

Professionals have a wide variety of tastes when it comes to the type of strings they use, the type of bow they use, and even the type of rosin they use. There is no one definitive rosin that is most popular for professionals, but what you will find is that most have made careful choices based on their climate and performance needs.

A violinist who performs regularly in a hot and humid climates is likely to choose a high-quality light rosin, where as a violinist living in a cold and dry climate may opt for a high-quality dark rosin.

Rosin can also be used to help balance out the tonal quality of a violin: if the violin has a brighter tone, a darker rosin may help balance out the brightness of the instrument. Conversely, if the violin has a very dark sound, a light rosin may help instead.

Finding the Best Violin Rosin

There is a wide variety of rosin for violin out there – don’t be overwhelmed when searching for the best violin rosin! Trying out some of these Top 10 Best Violin Rosins is a fun way to explore the subtleties of your violin’s sound, especially if you are a beginner player. If you live in a region that experiences different seasons, consider rotating rosins like you do your sweater drawer! With a little trial and error

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