10 Best Violin Cases in 2020: Reviews & Buying Guide

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While it’s highly likely that you already have a case for your violin, is it really the best violin case for your needs?

Perhaps you’ve discovered that your current violin case is too big or heavy, or perhaps it’s not big enough. Maybe the craftsmanship is poor and it is falling apart, or maybe it is suffering from general wear and tear. Or maybe you have simply outgrown it and are ready for a fresh and stylish upgrade.

Whatever your reasons, there is quite a lot to consider when shopping around for a new case – ranging from shape and weight to what the case itself is made of.

LET’S EXPLORE THE BEST VIOLIN CASES

1. ADM Basic Professional Triangular Shape Violin Case

This one is quite a bargain, especially for beginning and young musicians looking for a decent case without a big financial commitment. One of the biggest advantages is its lightweight foam construction and waterproof Nylon Oxford exterior design.

WEIGHT: 2.6 lbs

PROS:

  • Extremely lightweight
  • Suspension cushions
  • Accessory pocket
  • External sheet music pocket
  • Two bow holders
  • Straps provided for backpack or shoulder strap function

CONS:

  • Some customers have noted that the sheet music pocket is small
  • Some customers have noted that the zippers are unreliable
  • Not available in fractional sizes

2. Protec Violin Shaped MAX Case

The Protec Shaped MAX case is where price and value are in harmony. This case is great for tight budgets, yet it still offers sufficient protection while being ultra-lightweight with an EPS foam frame.

Its exterior is made of tough 600D nylon and it is built with suspension padding. It is also offered in many colors for the full-size model, and there is even a 3/4 size model available in black.

WEIGHT: 3.83 lbs

PROS:

  • Various color choices available in full size:
  • Fractional size available
  • Soft and plush interior
  • Suspension padding
  • Two interior storage compartments
  • External music and accessory pocket
  • Two bow holders
  • Option for backpack straps or shoulder strap
  • Subway handle

CONS:

  • Some customers have had issues with the zippers working properly

3. Protec Violin Oblong MAX Case

Similar to the shaped version, the Protec Oblong MAX case finds great balance in price and value. Its tough 600D nylon exterior offers durable protection while on-the-go. The built-in backpack straps can be easily tucked away when not needed with a discreet velcro flap.

WEIGHT: 6.5 lbs

PROS:

  • Soft and plush interior
  • Suspension padding
  • External and internal storage compartments
  • Two bow holders
  • Built-in backpack straps as well as shoulder strap function
  • Subway handle

CONS:

  • The backpack straps are not removable, so this could be cumbersome for some who would prefer not to use them at all
  • This case is on the heavier side
  • Not available in fractional sizes

4. Bobelock Half Moon Violin Case

The Bobelock Half Moon Violin Case pairs classic aesthetics with a new twist while also delivering reliable quality as a reputable brand. The case itself is a five-layered plywood case and is covered with black nylon.

This case is also offered in a wide variety of color variations to suit all personalities and tastes.

WEIGHT: 6.5 lbs

PROS:

  • Available in a variety of color combinations as well as fractional sizes.
  • Suspension cushions
  • Storage compartments: Accessories and external sheet music pocket
  • Two bow holders
  • Straps provided for backpack or shoulder strap function
  • Hygrometer
  • Humistat
  • Subway handle

CONS:

  • Some customers have said the shape can be awkward when in standing situations and holding the case vertically – such as when standing in line or on the subway

5. D’Luca Heavy Duty Oblong Case 

The D’Luca Heavy Duty Oblong Case is made of condensed molded plywood and offers a pleasing, traditional aesthetic. This case is a good bargain for advancing students.

WEIGHT: 6 lbs

PROS:

  • Suspension cushions
  • Accessory pocket
  • External sheet music pocket
  • Four bow holders
  • Straps provided for backpack or shoulder strap function
  • Hygrometer
  • String tube
  • Subway handle

CONS:

  • Not available in fractional sizes

6. Tonareli Cello-shaped Fiberglass Violin Case

The Tonareli cello shaped fiberglass violin case offers great value while also boasting a unique, stylish, and memorable design.

It is made of durable and lightweight fiberglass with a zipperless seal to provide high protection in inclement weather and fluctuating temperatures. The minimal size and backpack design make it perfect for commuting and traveling.

WEIGHT: 5 lbs

PROS:

  • Countless color choices available in full size. 
  • Removable accessory pocket
  • Two bow holders
  • Backpack straps provided
  • Its small size is perfect for airline overhead compartments
  • Full suspensionCountless color choices available in full size. 
  • Removable accessory pocket

CONS:

  • No music pocket
  • No subway handle
  • No option for shoulder strap function
  • Not available in fractional sizes

7. Tonareli Oblong Fiberglass Violin Case

The Tonareli oblong fiberglass case offers a sleek and modern design while also offering the durability and lightness of fiberglass.

Its zipperless seal offers ultimate protection against inclement weather and temperature fluctuations. It’s traditional oblong shape bridges the gap between modern aesthetic and traditional formality.

WEIGHT: 5.6 lbs

PROS:

  • Countless color choices available in full-size
  • Removable accessory pocket
  • Four bow holders
  • Straps provided for backpack or shoulder strap function
  • Subway handle
  • Full suspension

CONS:

  • No music pocket
  • One customer mentioned that it doesn’t stay open by itself, making it difficult to easily access the pocket during practice sessions.
  • Not available in fractional sizes

8. Baker Street BK 4030 Luxury Violin Case

This handmade Baker Street violin case is crafted with a rigid foam shell and a wood construction frame. The case is oblong in shape and boasts a luxurious aesthetic with two-toned, padded velour-like lining and rope accents.

WEIGHT: 6 lbs

PROS:

  • Two storage compartments
  • Sheet music pocket
  • 4 bow holders
  • Built-in hygrometer and thermometer
  • Option to use a shoulder strap or backpack straps
  • Includes a subway handle
  • Full Suspension

CONS:

  • Some customers have questioned the durability and craftsmanship of the case
  • Some customers have said that the KUN shoulder rest does not fit in the accessory pocket
  • Some customers have said the case did not fit their violin properly
  • Not available in fractional sizes

9. BAM France Contoured Hightech 2002XL

BAM France is a brand that delivers, offering the highest quality materials, craftsmanship, and sleek, modern design.

The Contoured Hightech 2002XL is particularly notable for its extremely light-weight and slim, minimalist design. The case itself is a triple-ply shell that’s made of BAM’s signature Hightech design, using two different types of ABS along with Airex foam.

BAM cases are held in high regard by the professional community and are often a go-to for career musicians.

WEIGHT: 3.5 lbs

PROS:

  • Many color choices available. 
  • Sleek, minimal size is perfect for storing in overhead compartments on planes and buses when traveling
  • Option for shoulder or backpack strap function
  • Airtight seal for optimal protection
  • Removable accessory pouch
  • Suspension padding
  • Two bow holders

CONS:

  • Some may prefer a more traditional aesthetic
  • No hygrometer
  • No music pouch
  • Most models do not have a subway strap (although this one does)
  • May be a tight fit for some violins
  • Not available in fractional sizes

10. BAM France Hightech 2011XL with Black Carbon Look

The Hightech 2011XL has a triple-ply shell that’s made of BAM’s signature Hightech design, using two different types of ABS along with Airex foam.

This case aligns itself with the same quality and standards that all BAM products boast.

WEIGHT: 5.3 lbs

PROS:

  • Select color choices available. 
  • Large Sheet music pocket
  • 4 bow holders
  • Option to use a shoulder-strap or backpack straps
  • Includes a subway handle
  • High-quality 
  • Durable
  • Air-tight seal
  • Suspension padding

CONS:

  • Some may prefer a more traditional aesthetic
  • No hygrometer
  • May be a tight fit for some violins
  • Not available in fractional sizes

HOW TO CHOOSE A VIOLIN CASE AND WHAT FEATURES TO LOOK FOR?

Size and Weight

The actual size of the violin case is mostly a preference issue, but it can also be important when considering airline travel. Because there are size restrictions for carry-on luggage, a smaller case is almost always going to make for a smoother experience.

Beyond that, it is really just a preference issue. Bigger-sized cases will almost always be a little heavier and have more room for accessories and sheet music. Smaller-sized cases may not even have a sheet music pocket, but they will usually be lighter and more minimal. It comes down to your preferences and lifestyle.

Straps and Backpack Functions

The shoulder straps and backpack functions are a huge consideration because it will ultimately determine how you carry your case on a day-to-day basis. It’s easy to be mesmerized by a cool-looking case while overlooking the practicality of using it daily.

For people who drive, it may be of less importance than for someone who has a daily commute on trains. The best violin cases are those that offer all functions, including straps that can be used to sling the violin on the shoulder or to wear as a backpack.

The Closing Seal

Many cases come with zippers only, some have a male-female almost suction-like closing seal, and others have both. While this can come down to preference, the main reason this is important is climate control.

The male-female closing seal will often offer more water resistance than a case with only a zipper closure. Also, zippers are more likely to break than a case with the male-female closing seal.

Suspension Padding

Almost all cases include this, but it is important to double-check just to be sure. Suspension padding is what helps to keep the violin safe in the case and reduce the intensity of impacts and movement while transporting the case. It is an absolute must-have, but don’t worry too much because it is a standard feature in almost every violin case.

Sheet Music Pockets

Some violin cases have them; some don’t. Some have a sheet music pocket that is shaped to match the violin, which could greatly decrease the actual space you can realistically use in the pocket. It’s good to be mindful of this, especially if you are planning to carry a lot of sheet music in the pocket.

And if you’re looking for a lighter-weight case, consider violin cases that eliminate the pocket altogether.

Accessory Pockets

Storage space for violin accessories is another point to consider. Some cases have removable accessory pockets which can be quite handy, especially in rehearsal situations. Something to take note of when evaluating the accessory pocket is the size.

Will the storage compartment be big enough to store your violin accessories (rosin, mutes, pencils, strings, etc.), or will you be forced to tote an extra bag for all your things? For some, this could be a dealbreaker point.

Hygrometer

A hygrometer is a circular dial that measures humidity levels. This is rather useful when maintaining the daily care of your violin and is especially important for those with finer and more delicate instruments.

When the humidity gets too low, this can eventually damage the violin. In these cases, it’s important to use some kind of humidifier to balance the humidity levels for the instrument.

While a beginner violinist may not need to think about this as much, a hygrometer will become a very important tool for advancing and professional violinists.

Bow holders

This is truly a practical consideration: how many bows do you need to store in your case?

For some, four bow spinners are an absolute must-have and can be a dealbreaker when choosing a case. For others, two bow spinners are just enough and maybe even more than enough.

Give some thought on your current needs, as well as your goals for your future as a violinist in the next few years, and choose accordingly. For instance, you may only need two holders now, but if you plan to purchase a third bow in the next few years, it would be wise to choose a case with four bow clips.

Does the violin fit?

Sometimes violins have subtle differences in shape – perhaps the lower or upper bout is ever so slightly larger than other violins. Another factor is the height of your chin rest.

Some chin rests are higher than others, making playing easier for some, but fitting into the case difficult for others. This can make finding a case that actually fits your violin to be an unpredictable process. Perhaps the one you want will fit perfectly with no problem. But if it doesn’t, be patient and try out another one until you find just the right fit.

Where does the shoulder rest go?

Some accessory pockets are big enough to hold the shoulder rest, but others aren’t. Often, these cases come with velcro loops underneath the neck of the violin to strap your shoulder rest in nicely. But if your case doesn’t have this either, it may be worth considering how you will transport your shoulder rest on a routine basis.

For many, not having a place to fit your shoulder rest could be an annoyance at best and a dealbreaker at worst.

Violin case shapes

It can be overwhelming to shift through various violin case shapes. While the differences are often an aesthetic preference, there are some other differences worth noting.

Oblong

This is the most traditional case shape you’ll see and it often offers the most space in terms of sheet music and accessory pockets. Oblong cases aren’t always, but can often be, heavier than other shaped cases that are naturally smaller in size. Oblong cases also usually have room for four bow holders instead of two.

Half Moon

The half-moon shape is kind of a compromise of size and space, bridging the gap between triangle-shaped cases and oblong-shaped cases. The half-moon will naturally be slightly lighter but will also have slightly less space than a traditional oblong case.

Triangle

The triangle-shaped case is much more minimal and sometimes does not include a sheet music pocket. It will usually be lighter-weight and more streamlined. These will almost always have only two bow holders. These cases are often the best size for air travel.

Shaped

The shaped violin cases are often more contemporary or playful in aesthetics. They can be crafted in the shape of the violin and are truly a minimal case. There will almost never be a sheet music pocket and definitely only two bow holders at most.

Violin case material

Foam

Foam is a cheap and easy material used to make many beginner-level and inexpensive violin cases. The benefit of foam is that it is extremely lightweight, but the downside is that it does not offer the durability and climate protection that a hard case could offer.

Wood

Wooden violin cases are much more durable than foam, yet it will always make for a heavier case. Despite this downside, wooden cases offer better climate protection than foam cases and could be a more economical option than higher-end materials like carbon fiber.

Carbon Fiber vs Fiberglass

While both carbon fiber and fiberglass offer strength and durability, carbon fiber is going to be much more lightweight than fiberglass. Carbon fiber is the go-to option for traveling musicians because of its durability in precarious environments.

Another added benefit is that carbon fiber and fiberglass cases tend to be more protected in rainy conditions than say a foam case. Full waterproofing cannot be guaranteed, but a carbon fiber or fiberglass case is going to be more water-resistant than a foam case.

CONCLUSION

There are so many factors to consider when choosing the best violin case, ranging from the size, shape, color, style, as well as versatility and other unique features. While this may seem overwhelming, such diverse options actually mean you’re more likely to choose one that is truly the best violin case for you.

Whether you’re looking for something sleek and modern, or something traditional and practical, the best violin case for you is out there.

Vena Johnsonhttps://www.venajohnson.com/
Vena is an American professional violinist and teaching artist with a passion for collaborative music and performance art. After studying, teaching, and freelancing in the greater-Philadelphia region for 10 years, Vena set off to travel the world with her violin. Her travels have almost always intersected with her passion for music performance, bringing her to Italy, Ireland, the Middle East, Nepal, India, China, and Japan, where she currently resides.

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5 COMMENTS

  1. I had no idea violin cases could be so expensive but also so affordable! I am glad I started researching it online. I was going to buy one I found at a local music shop but I wasn’t entirely sold on it so I put it back. There are a lot of things to consider that I really didn’t when I was shopping around so now that I know all of this, it will help me better decide which one is right for me and my violins.

  2. Having used both cheap and expensive cases, as well as a few from this list, I would have to recommend going with D’Luca’s. It is not insanely expensive but offers a lot of the perks of the higher end cases while remaining affordable for most violin players. I have the black one myself and it is the one I use the most.

  3. Fantastic reviews and breakdowns for each case! I have been shopping around for the last few weeks and could not decide on one that I wanted. I was torn between 3 different ones but these reviews really helped me to make a choice. ADM’s basic one is in my price range and the color matches my violin perfectly!

  4. I started playing the violin as a relaxing hobby to reduce anxiety and stress I was experiencing in college and I have to say, I fell in love with it. I have improved a lot and I am ready to make an investment in owning my own violin and case. Thanks so much for all this info for buying cases, I would not have considered half of these things.

  5. My daughter recently began taking up an interest in violin classes and over the summer, she will be attending weekly lessons starting in June. I want to make sure she has everything she needs so my husband and I agreed on getting her a great case and a brand new violin (the one she has now is used) for her 15th birthday which is later this month. Very happy to have found these reviews and recommendations.

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